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Logistics/Transportation Provider of the Year

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Port Tampa Bay

Florida’s largest steel port, Port Tampa Bay (PTB) moved 247,438 tons of steel and 370,775 tons of scrap metal in fiscal year 2016.

High volumes and velocities have the potential to increase hazards to both people and goods. To reduce that risk, PTB and Ports America, the terminal operator and stevedore for PTB’s general cargo berths, developed the Tampa Cooperative Safety and Security Initiative (TCSSI) with an initial focus on the steel berths.

Since its inception several years ago, TCSSI has grown to over 54 members drawn from the ranks of shipping lines and agents, local law enforcement such as the Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office and Hillsborough first responders, federal agencies such as the U.S. Coast Guard and U.S. Customs & Border Protection, trucking companies, surveyors and many other facets of shipping. A voluntary organization, TCSSI provides a positive reinforcement tool to increase safety awareness, assist in workers’ compensation programs and provide compliance with government safety standards.

In calendar year 2016 among the cargo berths and yards, there was only one lost time injury recorded with 147,000 hours logged. The lost-time frequency rate fell from 2.3 in 2015 to 1.36 in 2016. Lloyd’s List, one of the major global maritime underwriting organizations, selected PTB as the 2016 North American Port Operator of the Year.

Ports America counts more than 6,000 linear feet of berth and nearly 500,000 square feet of on-dock warehouse and transit-shed capacity to accommodate steel. Those capabilities are further augmented by a 100-tonne Gottwald mobile harbor crane.

Ports America is also part of Foreign Trade Zone #79, which gives customers flexibility. This ability to adapt to changing circumstances came into play this year when the U.S. Department of Commerce issued a decision affecting the importation of steel imports from China and Vietnam.

Coil-Tainer Ltd.

Despite their size and weight, they are surprisingly fragile, requiring specialized handling in rail, truck, or marine transport.

Conventional shipping leaves coils exposed to excessive handling, damage, as well as unpredictable sailing schedules, and limited ports of call. Growth has been strong with 35,000 pallets now in service worldwide. After 16 years of only handling steel coils, Coil-Tainer also branched out last year to add aluminum and even titanium.


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